Picking the Right DNA Isolation Kit for Your Application

Picking the Right DNA Isolation Kit for Your Application

If you plan to work with purified DNA in the lab, it’s likely that you will use a commercial DNA extraction kit to isolate and purify your DNA of interest. With so many types of kits available, it can be a major challenge to choose the best one to use when working with an unfamiliar…

How to Perform DNA Extraction from Dried Blood Spots Using Chelex Resin

Every bio- scientist who wants to analyze DNA knows that the process begins with the extraction of DNA from cells of interest. These cells could be RBCs, parasites, or bacteria to name a few. Furthermore, there are various DNA extraction methods1  to choose from depending on sample type, downstream analysis, and so forth. Many scientists…

How to Choose Your Method for DNA Extraction from Whole Blood

How to Choose Your Method for DNA Extraction from Whole Blood

Over the last few decades, PCR, next generation sequencing and microarray technologies have taken blood-based research to a new level. Modern blood-based application range from DNA fingerprinting, whole genome sequencing, blood banking to liquid biopsy and many more. Regardless of the application, pure, intact, double stranded and highly concentrated DNA extraction from whole blood is…

Eight Top Tips to Maximize Yield from Whole Blood DNA Isolation
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Eight Top Tips to Maximize Yield from Whole Blood DNA Isolation

When you perform genomic DNA extraction from whole blood, low yield or low quality DNA can result in many issues. No matter your intended downstream application—qPCR, next generation sequencing, Sanger sequencing, and so on—you need high quality DNA. We’ve made this step-by-step guide to assist you in getting the highest possible DNA yield and quality, and…

Garbage in, Garbage out? Quality Control of Your NGS Data

Garbage in, Garbage out? Quality Control of Your NGS Data

So, you’ve just received a call from the core facility that you hired to prepare and sequence your libraries. The facility director tells you that the sequence data from your next generation sequencing (NGS) experiment does not look good. You panic and, perhaps, let loose a scream of frustration—aaarrrrggghhhh! This project was going to be…