FISHing for miRNAs in Archived Tissues? Yes, It Is Possible!

We use fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) techniques routinely to detect DNA or RNA sequences in tissues, but what about micro RNAs (miRNAs)? No worries, FISH is now optimized to meet the challenge. To help you get going with the method, here’s what you need to know. The first thing that comes to mind when…

Challenges of Autofluorescence in Neuroscience
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Challenges of Autofluorescence in Neuroscience

If you have ever imaged biological samples, you have likely encountered autofluorescence. That pesky background coloration you see under the microscope, which can make it difficult to distinguish your actual signal from the noise.1 When you are trying to look for something as delicate as RNA, you don’t want to be hunting for your signal…

Catch of the Day: A Look into Different FISH Techniques

Catch of the Day: A Look into Different FISH Techniques

You are probably familiar with fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) to detect and localize the presence or absence of specific DNA sequences on chromosomes. But did you know there are numerous FISH experiment variations? Including high-resolution FISH and quantitative FISH? Read here about Fiber-FISH, Q-FISH, and Flow-FISH and decide if you would like to undertake one of…

How RNA-FISH Can Complement qPCR, and Vice Versa
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How RNA-FISH Can Complement qPCR, and Vice Versa

In studies of RNA abundance and gene expression, no one technique can answer all of the questions that need to be asked. So it is necessary to use a variety of experimental methods in concert. Two RNA detection and measurement techniques that complement each other well for this purpose are RNA Fluorescence in situ hybridization…