Explained: Sensor Chips for Surface Plasmon Resonance and Other Applications
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Explained: Sensor Chips for Surface Plasmon Resonance and Other Applications

Biosensor chip selection is a critical step in planning and running a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) experiment. Chip selection depends on the ligand or target that needs to be immobilized on the sensor chip, the analyte that is flowed over the target to study the binding, and the purpose of the biosensor assay (i.e., determination…

Examining Cell Interactions with Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) and Identifying Epitopes using SPR-Mass Spectrometry (MS)
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Examining Cell Interactions with Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) and Identifying Epitopes using SPR-Mass Spectrometry (MS)

Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) offers highly efficient, label-free detection for quantifying biomolecular interactions in real-time. Two exciting SPR variants that have sprung up in recent years are SPR for cellular analysis and SPR-mass spectrometry (SPR-MS). SPR for cellular analysis allows you to study how cells attach to different substrates and each other, while SPR-mass spectrometry…

Troubleshooting Surface Plasmon Resonance: Resolving Non-Specific Binding, Regeneration and Other Problems
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Troubleshooting Surface Plasmon Resonance: Resolving Non-Specific Binding, Regeneration and Other Problems

Surface plasmon resonance (SPR), a label-free, real-time way to examine protein binding and other molecular interactions, is getting easier as manufacturers have streamlined SPR instruments and supporting software. But problems can still arise. Troubleshooting Your SPR Assay Here are some common issues and suggestions to solve them: Inactive Targets Your target protein may have become…

Ten Ways to Give Your Surface Plasmon Resonance Experiments a Hand
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Ten Ways to Give Your Surface Plasmon Resonance Experiments a Hand

Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) is the gold standard for measuring biomolecular binding without the need for labeling (i.e., label free detection of kinetics). SPR is especially valuable because it doesn’t just provide information at the start and end of a binding event, but can be used to follow association and dissociation kinetics of biomolecules in real-time….