Yevgeniy Grigoryev's Profile

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Cell Counting with a Hemocytometer: Easy as 1, 2, 3

Many biological applications such as microbiology, cell culture, blood work and many others that use cells require that we determine cell concentration for our experiment. Cell counting is rather straightforward and requires a counting chamber called a hemocytometer, a device invented by the 19th century French anatomist Louis-Charles Malassez to perform blood cell counts. A […]

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In Cells and Model Organisms 8th of December, 2014
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Interview Techniques: Interview like a STAR

During your time interviewing for different jobs, more likely than not you will encounter employers who conduct behavioral interviews. What is a behavioral-based interview, you may ask? Behavioral interviewing is supposed to uncover your past job-related behavior to predict how you will behave in the future. It is based on the assumption that your past […]

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Mycoplasma: The Hidden Anarchist of Cell Culture

It is the black death of cell culture. Scientists don’t dare utter its name and many a graduate student has fallen victim to its indiscriminate menace. These stealthy anarchists infiltrate quietly but deliberately until their numbers swell and then they attack in strength, overwhelming their victims before they can put up a fight! What is […]

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In Cells and Model Organisms 4th of September, 2013
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5 Ways to Really Screw Up Your RNA Prep

Unlike DNA, which can last for eons (if stored correctly!), RNA is a fragile and degradation-prone cousin. After working with RNA for a while, one becomes quite paranoid about handling RNA because even a single sneeze or drop of saliva can potentially affect your results. The reason, which was discussed earlier, is that there are […]

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Crush Like an Elephant, Soak Like the Rain: Old-School DNA Gel Extraction

In my previous article on DNA gel extraction, I explained how most commercially available DNA gel extraction kits work. However, there was a time before our society was blessed with these convenient marvels of technology and scientists had to summon the gods of “Crush and Soak”. This method has been proven for millennia, as people […]

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How DNA Gel Extraction Works

Isolating pure DNA is key to many downstream applications for molecular biologists.  Isolating large quantities of pure DNA used to be a laborious task.  But thanks to commercially available kits, older methods have been streamlined to allow efficient recovery of pure DNA. In this article, I will talk about a method called DNA gel extraction, […]

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The A-Z List of Things that go “Missing” in the Lab

Here is a fun list of things that you are most likely to lose to light-fingered colleagues or nocturnal ghosts of academia. The emphasis here is on fun, so as disclaimers often go, if your experience proved somewhat different, this list “does not represent the actions of every individual or ghost who you might encounter […]

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Blast your way to quicker, cheaper bacterial transformations

If you want a more efficient, cheaper way to do bacterial transformation, if using a small DIY cannon to create a shockwave that forces bacteria to take up DNA from its surroundings sounds like your type of fun (if not, why not?!), you are definitely going to like this article. In a study published in 2011, […]

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Isolation of total RNA, including microRNA, from cells and tissues

Whereas DNA can survive for millennia, RNA is short-lived, which is a bummer if you are trying to isolate it. The reason – as we discussed recently – is that RNA is prone to degradation by enzymes called RNases. Therefore, isolation of total RNA from cells and tissues requires a method that will efficiently isolate […]

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Outgrown the Roost: Passaging Suspension Cells

Previously, you have learned about passaging adherent cells and read a quick protocol to make it happen. In this article, I will talk about passaging suspension cells. Some cells naturally live in suspension in body fluids and do not attach to surfaces, such as cells of hematopoietic origin found in our bloodstream. Culturing these suspension […]

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In Cells and Model Organisms 6th of February, 2013