Guacyara da Motta's Profile

DNA purification read on

Benzyl Isoamyl Alcohol: a Novel, Bizarre, and Effective DNA Purification Tool

DNA Purification We all use our favorite techniques for DNA cloning, such as Gibson assembly, TOPO cloning, ligation independent cloning (LIC), and TA cloning. However, DNA purification methods themselves, haven’t changed all that much since the 90’s. Historically, the introduction of phenol extraction in 1956, to purify nucleic acids from rat liver, rapidly replaced previous […]

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Guide to CRISPR/Cas9 Delivery: How to Maximize Your Editing Efficiency

In this webinar, you will learn how to maximize your genome editing efficiency using CRISPR/Cas9 and how to apply this technique in your research. The main points in the webinar will include: How to design guide RNAs using online tools specific to the genome and application of interest. Tips and practical advice to assist you […]

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In DNA / RNA Manipulation and Analysis, Genomics & Epigenetics 18th of April, 2017 Presented by: Allison Mayle
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Fluorescent Western Blotting: Lowdown and Advantages

In this article, I will introduce you to the world of fluorescent western blotting. Firstly, we’ll find out how it compares to chemiluminescent western blotting. Then, we will learn how infrared fluorescent western blotting can give you truly quantitative and reproducible results. Lastly, we’ll look at the many advantages of fluorescent western blotting, including the possibility to […]

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In Protein Expression & Analysis 11th of April, 2017
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Quantifying & Assessing RNA: TE or not TE?

Red Pill or Blue? Carrying out science often involves many difficult decisions! I see it all the time in RNA protocols – the “gracious” option of using purified water or Tris-EDTA (TE) buffer to dissolve (or elute, if you are using column purification) RNA. When I was trained in assessing RNA using UV spectrophotometry, graduate […]

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Revealing Cellular Dynamics with Millisecond Precision – The New Tool That Turned Electron Micrographs into Motion Pictures of Neural Communication

What if you can dissect the cellular dynamics with millisecond precision? What if you can unravel the morphological transformation of a neuron millisecond by millisecond using electron microscopy? Could this be even possible? In this webinar, we will talk about how optogenetics coupled with high-pressure freezing can make this possible. We will discuss how to […]

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In Microscopy & Imaging 29th of March, 2017 Presented by: Frédéric Leroux, Shigeki Watanabe
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Molecular Docking: Let the Docking Do the Talking

Want to know whether a lead molecule or a ligand of your choice interacts with a particular protein or a receptor? Do you want this information at your fingertips? All it takes is just a few clicks and key presses on the computer and then out comes a computational prediction. This computational process is also […]

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In Protein Expression & Analysis 28th of March, 2017
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Getting Through Graduate School: Advice from Beyond the Battlefield

“If you could go back in time, would you do it again?” It’s a question I’ve been asked more times than I can remember. If I knew what getting a PhD entailed, would I still have gone for it? I wish I could tell you “Absolutely”, but the truth is more like “I don’t know”. […]

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In Personal Development 27th of March, 2017
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Show Disparity in Gene Expression with a Heat Map

Have RNA-seq or microarray data? What possible tools can help you find your genes of interest? Is there any pattern in your expression data? I know you are totally at sea but heat maps are now commonly used to help. A heat map is a well-received approach to illustrate gene expression data.  It is an […]

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In Genomics & Epigenetics 24th of March, 2017
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Are Quantum Dots Any Good for Flow Cytometry?

What Are Quantum Dots? Quantum dots were discovered in the early 1980s. However, it was not until the late 1990s that their use in biological applications was suggested.1 Quantum dots are semiconducting nanocrystals made of artificial atom clusters. Their size generally ranges from 2 to 20 nm. Size is crucial for their physical properties because […]

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In Flow Cytometry 23rd of March, 2017
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Five Reasons Why You Should Have Hobbies While in Graduate School

You’ve chosen a career in science and gone off to graduate school because you love doing it. For you, lab is home. You are so used to wearing your lab coat all the time that when you go to the kitchen to boil water for your coffee, you can’t do it without wearing an apron! […]

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