Daniel Pataki's Profile

CRISPR read on

Four Ways to Get CRISPR Reagents Into Your Cells

Do you need to test the effects of mutating a gene in your system?  Then, CRISPR is the way to go. Your first step is to decide on good target sequences. Then, you have to get the two components of CRISPR: the Cas9 nuclease and “guide” RNA (gRNA). Even though you’ve read up on the technique […]

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Basic Bacterial Culturing Practices

Mastering basic bacterial culturing practices is a must if you are planning a career in microbiology! Growing bacteria might be one of the easiest things to do as a scientist. Also, as you’ve probably discovered, it’s even easier to do when you’re trying to prevent bacteria from growing where it shouldn’t be!! When we go […]

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In Cells and Model Organisms 9th of March, 2017
semiquantitative scoring read on

Analyze Immunostained Slides with Semiquantitative Scoring

A  routine task in the lab is to investigate the presence of your favorite protein in a range of histological samples. No doubt, staining your tissue sections using good old immunohistochemistry (IHC) would be your first choice. You just got to love a technique that has celebrated its 70th birthday, and is still used in […]

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ChemDraw: a Versatile Molecule Sketching Tool for (Bio)Chemists

Have you ever wondered how to make professional, easy-to-understand figures of molecules for presentations or publications? While several programs exist for this purpose, ChemDraw is like the Swiss Army knife of chemical sketching programs that most chemists and journals use to prepare figures. Beyond the ability to create chemically accurate and legible figures, ChemDraw can […]

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Cloning Large or Complex DNA Fragments

Sometimes you know a project is going to be a pain before you even start it. For me, that is whenever I need to clone large (> 3 kb) or complex (e.g., a sequence with repeats) DNA fragments. Long and complex DNA fragments are more likely to create challenges during cloning. Such projects require extra care in just about […]

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In DNA / RNA Manipulation and Analysis 21st of February, 2017
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Extracting Better Ubiquitin Data from Your Samples: Beyond the Cellular Skip

The ubiquitin-proteasome system was discovered at the start of the 1980s, and people have been studying it ever since. Initially, researchers thought that tagging a protein with ubiquitin was the cell’s signal for the protein to be scrapped via the proteasome. But more research has shown that, as with all biology, once you’re up close and […]

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In Protein Expression & Analysis 14th of February, 2017
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How DNA Extraction Is Different in Plants

I know what you are thinking, everything is made of cells, so how different can DNA extractions be in plants? The answer is… sort-of different. The overall concept is the same. Cell membranes are lysed, DNA is separated from other cell materials, washed a few times, and then resuspended in water or Tris-EDTA buffer (aka […]

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In DNA / RNA Manipulation and Analysis 13th of February, 2017
eQTL read on

Investigating an Expression Quantitative Trait Locus (eQTL)

Thousands upon thousands of genetic variants are now associated with every disease and trait you can possibly think of. Such traits range from cancers to blood pressure, intelligence, height, weight… and many more! This is largely because of the advent of genome-wide association studies (GWAS). However, the vast majority of genetic loci associated with these traits are […]

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intravital microscopy read on

Tips for Peering into the Interior of Mice Using Intravital Microscopy

Intravital microscopy (IVM) is a newer approach for the imaging of living tissues and organs in live animals. A wide variety of organs can be imaged in rodents–eyes, kidneys, brain, lymph nodes, and gut, to name a few. Imaging the organ at the site (in situ)  provides more physiologically relevant results. IVM coupled with multiphoton […]

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In Microscopy & Imaging 1st of February, 2017
Sponsored Education
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Data Analysis for Three-dimensional Volume Scanning Electron Microscopy

In recent years, three-dimensional (3D) scanning electron microscopy techniques have gained recognition in the biological sciences. In particular, array tomography, serial block face scanning electron microscopy (SBFSEM) and focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIBSEM) (described in Three-Dimensional Scanning Electron Microscopy for Biology) have shown an increase in biological applications, elucidating ultrastructural details of cells […]

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In Microscopy & Imaging 25th of January, 2017