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Solid Phase Reversible Immobilization read on

A Guide to Solid Phase Reversible Immobilization

  Scientists today depend heavily on many molecular biology techniques to perform their research. For example, with the advent of next generation sequencing (NGS): scientists are able to look at very minute details, right down to individual genetic sequence variations. However, the increase in experimental complexity means that every extra step becomes more crucial than […]

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Nanopore Sequencing

A disruptive sequencing technology Every new generation, a new concept is born and can completely reshape the landscape of biomedical research. Nanopore sequencing technology, although still at its infancy, is beginning to look like a “game-changer.” It’s a revolutionary concept in sequencing in which strands of nucleic acids are fed through a tiny pore (nanopore) […]

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In Genomics & Epigenetics 9th of July, 2016
alu-gag pcr read on

How to Quantify Integrated HIV Genomes Using Alu-gag PCR

Alu sequences are repetitive DNA sequences that are widely dispersed within the human genome. These “junk DNAs” are not as useless as one might think. An interesting method to use them is to quantify the number of integrated Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) genome copies using Alu-PCR.

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In PCR, qPCR and qRT-PCR 9th of July, 2016
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A Simple Way to Measure T cell Killing Activity In Vivo

Have you ever wondered what a cell’s life is like? Do they constantly communicate to each other or do they just go on their own daily business? There is an easier way and it involves super advanced molecular “crayon” technology.

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In Flow Cytometry 9th of July, 2016
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Entering the Digital Age for Quantitative PCR Analysis: Digital PCR

Digital PCR (dPCR) is a next generation qPCR that you might just need for quantitation and comparison of minute genetic copy differences.

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In PCR, qPCR and qRT-PCR 9th of July, 2016
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Locating Your Cellular Apoptosis Squad: Annexin V Staining Assays

In real life, cells are instructed to commit suicide for the greater good of the organism. The programmed cell death (apoptosis) is important during development of a multi-cellular organism. A good example you will appreciate is the dis-appreance of the tail from a tadpole as it turns into a frog. On the reverse, the lack […]

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In Flow Cytometry 9th of July, 2016
long range PCR read on

Long-Range PCR: It’s About Choosing the Right Enzyme

The ability for DNA polymerase to copy a long stretch of DNA is becoming increasingly important. Why? It has to do with the advances in our sequencing technologies. Our next generation sequencing (NGS) technology requires the DNA polymerase to copy a long stretch of DNA (sometimes up to 50kb) as NGS is churning out genetic […]

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In PCR, qPCR and qRT-PCR 9th of July, 2016
photonic pcr read on

Photonic PCR: When Lightening Strikes Your DNA

Before I get into today’s topic, please allow me to digress a bit and start with a few sentences that sum up the polymerase chain reaction (PCR); the grand-daddy of molecular biology. PCR, a method that is at the heart of modern day molecular biology discoveries, is a process that amplifies genetic material through our […]

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In PCR, qPCR and qRT-PCR 9th of July, 2016
real-time sequencing read on

Single Molecule Real-Time Sequencing

Recently, I have witnessed the uprising of various next generation sequencing (NGS) platforms and it’s quite interesting because each platform uses a different method. Previously, I’ve written about the exciting possibility of nanopore sequencing—a new sequencing technology based on the “signature” electrical currents generated as a single strand of DNA passes through the nanopore. The […]

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In Genomics & Epigenetics 9th of July, 2016
anchored multiplex PCR read on

Anchored Multiplex PCR for Next Generation Sequencing

Anchored multiplex PCR (AMP) is a powerful method for amplifying minuscule amount of nucleic acids. Combined with Next Generation sequencing, AMP just might be what you need to identify genetic mutations.

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In Genomics & Epigenetics 9th of July, 2016