user-75562

Alexandros A Lavdas received his MSc and PhD from UCL, where he studied the development of the cerebral cortex. He has since worked as a postdoctoral Fellow at UCL, deciphering the origin of GABAergic neurons in the rodent cortex, and the Hellenic Pasteur Institute, where he also worked as Researcher/Assistant Professor for a number of years, studying models of cell replacement therapy for CNS and PNS trauma. He has also spent shorter periods in Scripps, San Diego and the Pasteur Institute in Paris. He is currently a Senior Researcher at the European Academy in Bolzano, setting up the new state-of-the-art microscopy facility and beginning to work on cellular models of Parkinson’s disease.

Articles by user-75562:

Lasers for Confocal Microscopy

Lasers were once called “a solution looking for a problem.” The word—which is an acronym for Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation—used to conjure up images of deadly weapons from Sci-Fi movies and TV series. However, their increasing use in everyday life, first in CD players and then in barcode scanners and pointers, have…

07 Sep 2016 Microscopy & Imaging

Brightness and Contrast in Microscopy Imaging

The concepts of brightness and contrast are so general, and the issues related to them so many, that it may seem strange to have a single brief article with such a title. Indeed, when we speak about brightness, we can think about the brightness of the light source, the aperture and magnification of the lens,…

09 Jul 2016 Microscopy & Imaging

Resolving your Noise Complaints – the Basics of Signal/Noise Ratio in Microscopy

The resolution of any microscope is related to the numerical aperture of the lens and the wavelength of light used to form the image, and can be calculated using Abbe’s law (read more about Abbe’s law here). This, however, is the ideal situation – the best case scenario. In real life, resolution must be defined…

09 Jul 2016 Microscopy & Imaging

Spectral Unmixing in Fluorescence Microscopy

When we are doing a double labelling, it makes good sense to choose two fluorophores with spectra widely spaced apart to avoid mixing. Why combine GFP with Rhodamine, when you can combine it with Texas Red?

09 Jul 2016 Microscopy & Imaging

Confocal Expert Tips: Tips for Your Hour of Need!

Are your confocal image leaving you with something to be desired? Perhaps you think your images are good, but your wondering if they can be better? I’ve put together some top tips to get your confocal images looking the best they can. 1. Selecting Your X/Y Resolution There are other great articles where you can…

14 May 2015 Microscopy & Imaging

How to Measure FRET

In my previous article on FRET, I gave you some background on FRET – its mechanism and its applications. Here, I will expand, including what to measure when doing FRET. There are a number of approaches to FRET quantification: Sensitized Emission – This two-channel imaging technique uses an algorithm that corrects for excitation and emission…

04 Mar 2015 Microscopy & Imaging

You May Not Know Theodor Förster but You Know His Work: FRET

If you think FRET stands for Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer, you are wrong…in good company but wrong. FRET actually stands for Förster Resonance Energy Transfer. Find out why and more about FRET in this article. In 2011, it was the centenary of the birth of eminent German physical chemist Theodor Förster. Förster was a very…

03 Feb 2015 Microscopy & Imaging

Is There Overlap? Find Out with a Proximity Ligation Assay

Colocalization blues (and reds and greens) Trying to find if and where two epitopes co-localize (or, to be more precise, where they are found in close proximity) may seem easy at first: 1) Bind your two epitopes with primary antibodies from two different species, 2) bind these primary antibodies with two secondary fluorescent antibodies, one…

04 Nov 2014 Microscopy & Imaging

Analysing Microscopy Images? What You Should Know About Dynamic Range: Part 2

In the first part of this article (you can read it here), we looked at clipping and saturation in terms of microscope images, followed by a definition of Dynamic Range and an introduction to Bit Depth. Intrascene Dynamic Range The dynamic range which can be detected at the same time in the same field of…

03 Jun 2014 Microscopy & Imaging

Analysing Microscopy Images? What You Should Know About Dynamic Range: Part 1

Ever tried to turn the volume all the way up on a small radio or small stereo system? (Hopefully you have not tried it with earphones in!) Notice how, after some point, the sound didn’t get any louder- it just got more distorted? That’s because you’ve hit the ceiling of your machine’s dynamic range.  It’s…

13 May 2014 Microscopy & Imaging